Philip O'Sullivan's Market Musings

Financial analysis from Dublin, Ireland

Market Musings 4/3/2012

with one comment

Big share deals and Ireland Inc have provided the most interest since my last market update. Let’s see what the lessons from these are.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Ryanair plc) To kick off with the transport sector, Ryanair announced that it bought back 9.5m of its own shares at a cost of €39m. This is particularly interesting in light of comments made on the carrier’s conference call post its Q3 results that it could spend up to €200m on share buybacks. This should help to prop up the share price against the pressure of the recent spike in oil prices. I hope to do a detailed piece on Ryanair over the coming days.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Smurfit Kappa Group plc) To switch from the purchase of a big block of shares to a sale of one, private equity houses Cinven and CVC announced that they sold a 9.7% stake in Smurfit Kappa Group for €158m. The two retain an 8.2% position which is subject to a lock-in agreement until the release of SKG’s Q1 results in May – which I can’t help but wonder if this will be seen as a near-term overhang on the stock – time will tell.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Irish Continental Group plc) These big share transactions bring to mind a lot of the other stakes in Irish plcs that could change hands this year. The Irish government has signaled a willingness to sell its 25.1% stake in Aer Lingus. One51 has said that it will sell non-core assets, which I assume includes its circa 12% stake in Irish Continental Group. How long will baked goods company Aryzta hold on to its 71.4% shareholding in agri group Origin Enterprises plc for? Given the recent boardroom dispute at UTV Media, what are the intentions of its 18% shareholder and fellow Irish plc TVC Holdings? We could be in for an interesting few months ahead.

 

Switching to Ireland Inc, the IMF struck a relatively positive note about the country’s prospects. However, the fiscal crisis continues to drag on. Exchequer Returns data for the first two months of the year revealed that the year to date deficit stands at €2.07bn versus €1.95bn in the same period in 2011. The tax take increased from €4.9bn to €6.3bn, but voted expenditure (the part of spending that the government has full discretion over) rose by €474m – this is a disappointing performance. Non-voted expenditure ballooned from €580m to €1.6bn, let by a massive increase in interest costs on the national debt (€848m vs only €61m) and a €250m loan to the insurance compensation fund. The interest costs serve as a reminder of the consequence of this government’s (and its predecessor’s) failure to close the fiscal jaws been revenue and spending. It is astonishing, given the unemployment and emigration crises Ireland is facing, that the government spent 10x on national debt interest costs (€848m) in the first 2 months of 2012 than it did on the Department of Jobs, Enterprise & Innovation (€84.5m).

 

Finally, in the blogosphere Neonomic did up a good piece on Home Retail Group, which owns Argos and Homebase, that’s worth a read.

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Written by Philip O'Sullivan

March 4, 2012 at 10:23 am

One Response

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  1. [...] its shareholding from one wholly-owned subsidiary to another. As a totally unrelated aside, earlier this week I speculated that One51′s ICG stake could be offloaded this [...]


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