Philip O'Sullivan's Market Musings

Financial analysis from Dublin, Ireland

Posts Tagged ‘United Drug

Market Musings 28/8/2012

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It has been a busy day on the results front in Ireland, particularly in the TMT sector.

 

To kick off, UTV Media, which has interests in the radio (local stations in the UK and Ireland, and the national talkSPORT station in the UK), television (the ‘Channel 3′ – ITV – franchise for Ulster) and new media (website design, marketing, broadband) segments, released its interim results this morning. This revealed a resilient performance in what are, clearly, challenging end-markets, with revenues and pre-tax profits climbing 4% and 3% respectively. The group continues to make impressive progress in terms of strengthening its financial position, cutting net debt by 21% over the past year to £50.0m. Across the group, UK radio revenues powered ahead, helped by the benefits of Euro 2012. Irish radio significantly outperformed, rising 4% in local currency terms, despite an estimated 10% fall in total Irish radio advertising in the first 6 months of 2012. The reason for this outperformance is that UTV’s Irish stations are all focused on the key urban markets on the Island of Ireland, which gives it a relatively more attractive proposition to offer to advertisers. On the television side, revenues and profits were down, with weak Irish advertising conditions to blame. With regard to the small new media business, margins were under pressure due to ‘competitive pricing’. In terms of the outlook, it looks like the rest of the year will see similar trends to the above, with outperformance on the radio side, underperformance in television and modest topline growth in new media. Not that investors should be too perturbed by this, as UTV is doing a decent enough job despite the challenging macro backdrop.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Datalex plc) I was pleased to see Datalex release very strong interim results today. Reflecting last year’s new contract wins (including Air China and SITA), revenues rose 18% to $15.7m. Reflecting the operating leverage inherent in Datalex’s model, nearly all of this  translated into profits – I note that in the first 6 months of 2012 Datalex generated gross profits of $2.8m, 82% of the total for the whole of 2011! This positive momentum should be sustained into 2013, with the likes of Indonesia’s Garuda and Fiji’s Air Pacific having gone live since the start of the year, while a number of other carriers including Delta are scheduled to go live later this year. On the balance sheet front, Datalex is guiding a 20%+ rise in cash reserves in 2012. Overall, these are excellent results, and continued good news on the new client wins front bodes well for the future. I’m not surprised to see the shares shoot higher in Dublin today.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Independent News & Media plc) INM completed the restructuring of its board, with the election of four new directors and the appointment of a new Chairman and Senior Independent Director. With this out of the way, hopefully the focus can move on to the more crucial issue of repairing the firm’s balance sheet, and on this front the Irish advertising trends noted by UTV must surely bode ill for INM.

 

Insurer FBD posted solid H1 results today. The numbers were in-line with expectations, while management is sticking to its FY guidance. Within the results it was interesting to see that FBD has reduced its exposure to government bonds by over 40% in the year to date – this is a sensible move given what I believe to be a bubble in government bonds in Europe – although its exposure to equities remains low, at just 4% of total underwriting investment assets.

 

United Drug announced another two acquisitionsDrug Safety Alliance (total consideration, including earn-outs, of $28m) and Synopia (total consideration, including earn-outs, of $12m). Both businesses will form part of United Drug’s Sales, Marketing & Medical division. These deals take the number of acquisitions the firm has made so far in 2012 to six (five operating businesses and one property acquisition), so bedding these down will presumably take up a lot of management’s time over the next while.

 

In the resource sector Petroceltic’s H1 release contained no material ‘new news’. Management is focused on successfully executing the merger with Melrose Resources.

 

And that’s pretty much all that’s caught my attention so far today. Tomorrow brings results from PTSB, Grafton, Paddy Power and Glanbia, which will no doubt provide much food for thought.

Written by Philip O'Sullivan

August 28, 2012 at 2:51 pm

Market Musings 22/8/2012

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Having been on holidays in Finland and Estonia for the past week, today’s update represents something of a ‘revision session’ as I look through what has been happening since my last update on the stocks that comprise my investment universe.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in AIB plc) To start off with the banks, according to press reports, AIB is looking to reduce its pension deficit by transferring loan assets into it. This is a common-sense move by the bank, which reported a pension liability of €1.5bn at the end of June, and I wonder if it might provide some food for thought for other businesses that find themselves asset rich but cash poor.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in CRH plc) Ireland’s biggest company, CRH, tempered its full-year guidance when it released interim results a few days ago. Having previously forecast that it anticipated “overall like-for-like sales growth in 2012 and a year of progress for CRH”, it now says: “we expect that EBITDA for the year as a whole will be similar to last year’s level”. Tougher macro conditions are to blame, which are clearly beyond the control of the group, although it is mitigating these pressures through cost take-out measures and a focus on cash generation (cash earnings per share, at 85.8c in H1 2012, was well above the 67.1c achieved in H1 2011). On the M&A front the group stepped up its activity here, agreeing to total consideration of €235m for 17 deals in the first six months of the year up from the €172m spent in the same period last year. Overall, the high implied rating that CRH trades on allied to tough end markets means it is difficult to see the shares push significantly higher from here in the short term. This is compounded by a paucity of obvious near-term catalysts for the stock – its next investor day isn’t until November and its next development update isn’t expected until early 2013. One thing that could change that is a substantial earnings-enhancing deal, but on the M&A front it should be noted that CRH’s style is to go for modest bolt-ons over spectacular large transactions (recent chatter around India notwithstanding).

 

Elsewhere in the construction space Kingspan released good H1 numbers, which came in ahead of market expectations. Encouragingly, there was a good lift in margins (up 100bps to 7.00%) which underlines the strength of this performance. That Kingspan is outperforming the market shouldn’t be seen as a big surprise, however, given that its insulation base gives it a structural edge over more cyclical building materials companies. The benefits of recent acquisitions, particularly as they are integrated into the business, points to a solid outlook for this firm despite the macro headwinds.

 

In the energy space Dragon Oil released solid interim results. Management is sticking to its medium-term targets, and given its track record few would argue with them. It was interesting to see Dragon Oil is bidding for licences in Afghanistan – these are located in the more stable northern region of the country.

 

In other resource sector news, Petroceltic announced a merger with Melrose Resources. I don’t follow either company closely, but on paper this looks like a sensible deal which creates a reasonably sized group focused on the Black Sea, North Africa and the Mediterranean Sea with a blend of production, development and exploration assets – hopefully a case of the whole being more than the sum of the parts.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in PetroNeft plc) Wrapping up on what’s been happening in the energy sector, there was an interesting deal in Siberia which has read-through for PetroNeft. TNK-BP sold $400m worth of assets in the region at an implied price of $2.56 a barrel – this is 3x the implied value of PetroNeft, all of whose assets are located in the region.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Independent News & Media plc) In the TMT sector INM’s 30% owned associate, Australasian media group APN, released its interim results. While its underlying performance was in-line, it took a huge (A$485m – a 70% write-down) charge against the value of its New Zealand print assets. This distracted from a stable topline (continuing operations’ revenues +1% yoy) while underlying operating costs fell 3.3% yoy to A$357m and finance costs were nearly 10% lower yoy. Net debt has fallen to A$470m from A$637m at the end of 2011, helped by the restructuring of the outdoor business. Ominously for INM, APN cut its interim dividend from A3.5c to A1.5c, so INM’s cashflow won’t be helped by lower dividends coming from the southern hemisphere this year.

 

In the healthcare segment there was a good bit of news from United Drug in recent days. In its Q3 IMS management revealed that it now expects 8-10% earnings growth in 2012, a big increase from the previous guidance of 4-8%. The company also said that it is considering moving its listing from Dublin to London, which surely increases the pressure on the Irish Stock Exchange to seek a deal with another European exchange before it loses any more top plcs. The group also bolstered its Packaging & Specialty division with the acquisition for $61m of Bilcare’s UK and US clinical supplies unit. This is a sensible deal which further enhances UDG’s presence in that space.

 

And finally, one thing that might provide a lift to my readers in Clonmel today is that C&C’s Magners appears to be making a big marketing push in Finland – in a few of the bars in Helsinki I visited (where a pint* can set you back nearly a tenner!) I noticed that all the bar staff were wearing Magners branded t-shirts and the bottled stuff was widely available. Cider is wildly popular in Scandinavia (Kopparberg hails from Sweden) – by way of illustration, in terms of draught most of the pubs I was in only had two taps – one for either Koff or Karhu and one for cider. Magners is also stocked by the Finnish alcoholic beverage retail monopoly, the charmingly named Alko. So, while I don’t claim to have conducted exhaustive field research (not least given the prices the pubs charged!) it does highlight that Magners is making progress outside of its traditional markets. In its FY12 results C&C revealed that, outside of Ireland and the UK, worldwide Magners volumes grew 28% over the past financial year, with circa 10% of Magners revenue now coming from outside of the British Isles.

 

* Actually, being good Europeans the Finns sold 0.5 litre drinks in pint glasses.

Market Musings 27/7/2012

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Blogging has been extremely light as I’m in the final stages of an internship as part of my MBA studies. However, newsflow has been anything but light! So, this blog represents a catch-up on what has caught my eye whenever I’ve been able to find the time to track what’s been happening in the markets this week.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Allied Irish Banks plc and PTSB plc) There was a lot of news out of the Irish financials this week. AIB released its interim results this morning. Overall, AIB has made good progress on deleveraging and deposits, but more work is needed on margins and costs. To take those in turn, I was encouraged to see that the LDR has improved by 13 percentage points to 125% since the start of the year, helped by €3bn of deposit inflows and non-core loanbook disposals. However, the net interest margin has worsened to 1.24% (pre-ELG) from the 1.36% seen in H12011. Hence, it was no surprise to hear management guide that it will raise mortgage rates in the autumn. As things stand, AIB is currently loss-making before even taking provisions into account, and the group will have to address this through a combination of rate hikes and cost take-out measures. Elsewhere,  PTSB revealed further details on its restructuring plans, but given its limited new lending ability and shrinking presence in the market I can’t see it being anything other than a marginal player for quite some time to come.

 

In the energy sector Providence Resources released an exciting update in which it revealed that there may be up to 1.6bn barrels of oil at its Barryroe Field, offshore Cork. Obviously it’s early days yet with this discovery, but it’s a stock that merits taking a look at. Once I’ve completed my internship it’s on my list of stocks to look at in more detail. Elsewhere, its Irish peer Tullow Oil released H1 results that contained few surprises given the level of detail provided in its recent trading update.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Marston’s plc) UK pub group Marston’s released a solid trading update, which revealed a satisfactory performance despite the recent wet weather.

 

Sticking with food and beverage stocks, Glanbia announced the $60m acquisition of a US beverage firm, which looks a perfect fit for its nutrition operations. This is another example of Glanbia’s successful forward integration strategy, which looks well placed to deliver strong returns over time.

 

Another Irish firm on the M&A prowl was United Drug, which acquired a German headquartered contract sales outsourcing firm for €35m, which will fit well within its existing Sales, Marketing & Medical division. An EV/Sales multiple of 0.23x is undemanding for a firm like this, so it looks a good deal to me.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Ryanair plc) Low-cost carrier Easyjet upped its PBT guidance, despite euro weakness, to a range of 280-300m. Prior to that the consensus was £272m. I assume the read-through from this for Ryanair, which reports numbers on Monday, is positive given that the euro weakness is near-term bullish for it (it generates a third of revenues from the UK, while it hedges its fuel and related USD exposures).

 

In the construction space, UK builders merchant group Travis Perkins’ interim results revealed a slowing performance in Q2. Management doesn’t see growth returning until 2014, so it’s not a sector I see a pressing need to gain exposure to anytime soon.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in France Telecom plc) There was a lot of news in the telecoms sector. Spain’s Telefonica followed the lead of KPN and cut its dividend. France Telecom released its interim results, in which the firm reiterated its full-year cashflow targets, which is somewhat reassuring. France Telecom is a stock I’ve been negative on for some time and which I am looking to exit in the near future due to its inflexible cost base, intense competitive pressures in its home market and my fear that it will cut its dividend.

 

In the media space UTV announced that it has broadened its partnership with the English Football Association to broadcast rights around the FA Cup, Charity Shield and selected England internationals.

 

Ireland’s Central Statistics Office released its latest data on Irish house prices, which provide few grounds for optimism. While a lot of the recent media commentary has focused on monthly moves, I prefer to look at prices on an annual basis, given that month-on-month moves can be distorted by the small number of transactions happening in the market at this time. The latest data show that Irish house prices declined by 14.4% year-on-year in June 2012. This is a fall of a greater magnitude than what we saw in June 2011 (-12.9% yoy) and June 2010 (-12.4% yoy). The picture in Dublin is even worse (prices -16.4% yoy in June 2012) which is particularly concerning given that the capital will lead the eventual recovery in Irish house prices (due to much tighter supply and it being the economic heart of the country). Overall, I reaffirm my view from last month, namely that I don’t see any obvious catalyst for a sustained improvement in Irish property prices in the near term.

Market Musings 27/6/2012

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The big news from corporate Ireland this morning is C&C’s Q1 interim management statement. In its first projection for the current financial year, the company sees FY operating profits of €112-118m (last year: €111m). Its core cider brands struggled in Q1, due to poor weather and tough comparatives, but other parts of its portfolio are performing strongly. Regular readers of this blog will recall that a few months ago I wrote that Tennent’s lager appeared to be making headway in pubs here, and this morning C&C revealed a near-50% increase in Tennent’s sales in Ireland as the brand is now available in 1,200 pubs (16% of the total). Overall, this is a pretty much as-expected statement from C&C, but at this early stage of the year it’s hard to make a definitive call on the full-year outlook (who knows, we could have an excellent July and August on the weather front!). On a more fundamental view, the group has an extremely strong balance sheet (net cash was €68m at the end of its last financial year) and has been doing a good job of managing its portfolio of brands in challenging consumer conditions of late. It’s a stock I like.

 

Elsewhere in the food sector, Glanbia confirmed what’s already in the public domain about the potential restructuring of its Dairy Ingredients Ireland operation, namely that it’s plotting to establish a jv with its majority shareholder, the Glanbia Co-op, to manage this business, which is set to experience a dramatic increase in volumes once EU milk quotas are lifted from 2015. This restructuring would be a positive move for all parties concerned, in that it would free up additional capital for the plc to support its push into the high-growth, high-margin ingredients space while giving the JV the freedom to pursue a strategy that could feasibly create a northern hemisphere version of New Zealand powerhouse Fonterra.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Independent News & Media plc) In the media space, we saw a battle for control of Australia’s Fairfax media group, which could have consequences for INM’s Australasian associate APN News & Media. Elsewhere, UTV Media lost out to Global Radio in the bidding war for GMG’s radio portfolio. However, as I said a few days ago, this has given rise to serious competition concerns, which could potentially lead to other acquisition opportunities for UTV Media et al.

 

In the healthcare space, United Drug made a £13m bolt-on acquisition of a UK medical communications company, which will fit perfectly within its Sales, Marketing & Medical division. This transaction is obviously small from a group context, but nonetheless helps to further diversify United Drug’s revenue streams.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in BP plc) Oil behemoth BP did some further portfolio management in recent days, offloading assets in Wyoming and the North Sea for a combined $1.3bn. Throw in the $20-30bn it is likely to receive from a successful sale of its economic interest in TNK-BP and the firm will have a significant war chest to make further acquisitions (or fund a chunky special dividend) with.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in RBS plc) The worst of the IT problems that have dogged RBS in recent days appear to be behind the group, and attention is now switching to the fallout. Reuters spoke of a £100m+ bill, but this may prove extraordinarily ambitious, with reports of people being kept imprisoned due to bail money not being processed properly and patients’ medical treatment being imperiled coming to light. Doubtless RBS will be writing a lot of cheques to assuage public anger following this foul-up.

 

There was a lot of excitement around Irish house prices since my last blog post, with the release of official data that show Dublin residential property prices have advanced (marginally) on a month-on-month basis for each of the past three months (national prices were +0.2% mom in May, -15.3% yoy). Despite this recent improvement, residential prices in Dublin, which is going to be the part of the country that leads the market, are still -17.5% on an annual basis (and 57% below the peak) so it seems a little premature to bring out the champagne bottles. The ongoing difficulties in the domestic economy are likely to hold back property prices for some time to come yet, while this December’s budget should bring in further tax increases, not least given that the government has repeatedly demonstrated a lack of willingness to right-size public spending, which will further limit peoples’ ability to service mortgages. Add a lack of mortgage credit availability into the mix and I don’t see any obvious catalyst for a sustained improvement in Irish property prices in the near term.

 

In the blogosphere, Lewis wrote about Dart Group, perennial favourite of the value investing blogosphere (albeit not one for me – given that I already have exposure to some of its competitors e.g. Ryanair and Total Produce).

Written by Philip O'Sullivan

June 27, 2012 at 8:10 am

Market Musings 16/6/2012

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After a relatively quiet 2012 on the M&A front, at least where Irish stocks are concerned, it’s nice to be able to write a blog where ‘buying and selling’ is a key theme.

 

United Drug splashed out €30m on buying Dublin warehousing and office buildings. While it’s good to see deals like this happening in Ireland again more generally, from a UDG specific view it’s a prudent measure that saves €750k a year (which was due to increase by 15% in 2014 and by the same percentage every five years on the lease thereafter).

 

Food ingredients group Glanbia has seen its share price tumble by circa 10% so far this month. One possible explanation for this is the chance of a secondary placing of stock by its majority shareholder, the Glanbia Co-op, to fund a €150-200m milk processing plant to cater for the expected significant increase in output that will accompany the lifting of EU quotas. Speaking of plants, Greencore offloaded the Minsterley facility, acquired as part of its takeover of Uniq plc, for £4.3m to Muller. This is obviously immaterial in a group context, but highlights the rapid pace at which management at Greencore have integrated Uniq.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Independent News & Media plc) Following on from my recent blog about INM’s South African unit, The Irish Times ran a piece covering local sentiment towards a possible deal. While I’ve long argued that the minority stake in APN should be the preferred asset for disposal, the increased chatter around INM’s South African unit suggests that it’s likely to be a different southern hemisphere business that is offloaded by the group. Speaking of INM and the southern hemisphere, the group also announced that it will delist from the New Zealand stock exchange, a ‘low hanging fruit’ cost-cutting move that should have happened years ago in my view.

 

Given that we’re about 5 years into Ireland’s economic disaster I had a look at Sharewatch’s handy table of prices of ISEQ listed stocks to see which of them are trading on share prices that are one-third or less of their levels from the summer of 2007. While it was no surprise to see the banks at the bottom of the pile, it was a little surprising to see quality names such as C&C, Kingspan, Grafton and FBD also down there. I assume Kingspan and Grafton are affected by the “Ireland discount”, yet both make the vast majority of their profits (KSP: >95%, GN5: >90%) overseas.

 

The incomparable Zerohedge posted an interesting chart showing global banks’ LDRs. I was surprised to see the Nordic banks so high up the chart, and given the risks around wholesale funding costs I would be (at first glance – I don’t follow the Scandinavian financials closely) instinctively nervous of them for that reason. For reference, of Ireland’s remaining listed banks, their LDRs at the end of 2011 were: AIB 136%, Bank of Ireland 144% and Permanent TSB 227%.

 

One of the highlights of the UK and Ireland investment blogosphere for me is the healthy debates that take place within it. It’s always useful to have one’s assumptions tested, not least given that it reduces the risk of destructive phenomena such as groupthink from creeping in. One of the regular topics of discussion is what should be counted within a firm’s enterprise value. For me I always add the pension deficit (or surplus) to the market cap and net debt (or cash), but there are dissenters who say – and I appreciate that this is a perfectly arguable point – that the efficient market hypothesis tells us that the share price (and by extension the market cap) already discounts factors such as the pension deficit and other obligations such as leases. However, given the polarised views about “whether pensions matter”, or whether leases should be viewed as a mere operating expense rather than a financial claim, along with investors’ cognitive biases (which we’re all guilty of) and other human errors, I don’t subscribe to the view that the share price tells us more or less everything. Lewis at Expecting Value wrote an interesting piece analysing the EVs of both Trinity Mirror (which I am a shareholder in) and Debenhams, which to me highlighted both the latter’s enormous operating lease liability, while for the former I was struck by the thought that any improvement in the outlook either for advertising or its inherent cashflow generation could lead to a very significant (in percentage terms) re-rating of the stock (and, of course, vice versa). Anyways, this is a debate that I’m sure will continue to run – and if you’ve any views on this issue, please post them in the comments section.

Written by Philip O'Sullivan

June 16, 2012 at 7:42 am

Market Musings 9/5/2012

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Since my last update markets have been rocky on the back of election results in France and Greece in particular. Notwithstanding this present volatility, however, I don’t see this as a game-changer, given that Hollande was the front-runner for the French presidency for quite some time before the election, while Greece has for so long been anything but well-behaved that the election of a large number of cranks to its parliament is unlikely to result in any deviation from the Hellenic Republic’s recent record when it comes to compliance with sound economic policies. What the pullback in the market means for me, if anything, is that some of the stocks I was looking to buy are now more attractively priced, but more on this anon.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in CRH plc) We got an interim management statement this morning from CRH. I, and indeed all of the brokers whose preview notes I saw ahead of this announcement, had expected the company to guide that H1 EBITDA would increase compared to year-earlier levels on the back of improving trends in North America and the benefits of cost take-out programmes. In the event, the company is guiding “overall EBITDA in the less significant first half of the year to be close to last year’s level”. While the firm is sticking with its “overall like-for-like sales growth in 2012 and a year of progress for CRH” full-year guidance, I think this is a disappointing statement in light of more upbeat releases from peers in recent times. Other points of note within the statement include: (i) Regional performance as expected, with “a firmer tone in construction markets in the United States” and a weaker economic backdrop in Europe; and (ii) Development spend appears somewhat underwhelming – CRH said it spent €230m on 13 acquisitions and investments in the year to date. This compares with the €186m spent in H12011. Given CRH’s strong balance sheet, I would have hoped that the company would have stepped up its development spend more significantly by now. Overall, I see little in this statement to get enthusiastic about.

 

Elsewhere, United Drug issued its H1 numbers this morning. Going into it I had expected the group to have faced headwinds due to the impact of healthcare cutbacks, in the event the group unveiled a robust performance, achieving both topline growth and an impressive (8%) increase in earnings per share. Management is sticking to its full-year guidance of 4-8% growth in EPS, but given the H1 performance I suspect the risks to United Drug’s numbers lie to the upside.

 

Tullow Oil saw its share price close up over 3% yesterday on the back of a chunky oil discovery in Kenya. The company’s strike rate when it comes to finding new resources is to my knowledge unparalleled in the industry, and  is a testament to the outstanding team built around exploration director Angus McCoss.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in BP plc) Speaking of oil stocks, I followed through on my recent commitment to add to my sterling denominated assets and I doubled my position in BP at 420p yesterday. While I appreciate that the oil price is under pressure at this time, for me I think there is a hell of a lot of downside risk priced into BP at these levels (just under 6x PE), while the prospective dividend yield of 5.4% is particularly attractive relative to the poor returns presently available from traditional ‘income assets’.

 

One of my Twitter ‘followers’ asked me if I was concerned about the FX risk after I loaded up on BP shares yesterday. I replied that I was bearish on the euro both in the short-term (due to the market’s nervousness around France, Greece and Ireland) and the long-term (due to growing policy incoherence at the EU level as more and more of the architects of the present strategy are being rejected at the ballot box). For this reason I’ve been buying exposure to sterling both through equities and by moving cash from euro into sterling.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in RBS plc) Following its recent Q1 results, RBS CEO Stephen Hester gave an interview that contained a few interesting nuggets. I have to say I’m really getting a sense that the bank has turned the corner, as illustrated by some of Hester’s comments in that clip.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in France Telecom plc) In the telco space, Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim’s America Movil bid to raise its stake in Holland’s KPN. With Hutchison Whampoa reportedly prowling round Ireland’s eircom, not long after it bought Orange Austria from France Telecom, who also sold Orange Suisse to private equity firm Apax, this pick-up in M&A activity is presumably bullish for sector valuations. France Telecom is trading at a small discount to my valuation on the company, and I am monitoring the share price closely with a view to exiting the position. Hopefully these developments mean that I can escape from it sooner rather than later!

 

In the macro space, the Adam Smith Institute, which is one of my favourite think tanks, happened upon this great chart which illustrates that Ireland is not the only country in Europe where many politicians and media commentators talk of ‘austerity’, while in reality government spending is in fact little changed compared to the past couple of years.

Written by Philip O'Sullivan

May 9, 2012 at 7:36 am

Market Musings 6/5/2012

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(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Independent News & Media) Since my last update, Denis O’Brien confirmed that he has increased his stake in Independent News & Media to 29.9%, which is the maximum level he can own without being compelled to bid for the balance of the company. The next largest shareholders are Sir Anthony J. O’Reilly on 13.3% and Dermot Desmond on 5.75%, so half of the company’s shares are held by those three individuals. This will presumably see the Irish Stock Exchange reduce its free float determination on INM and hence the company’s weighting, but if O’Brien’s purchases lead to deeper efforts to reform the group and lift profitability that will hardly matter to the rest of INM’s shareholders.

 

Aer Lingus announced that it is to pay its maiden dividend as a publicly quoted company. The 3c/share dividend works out at a 3.1% yield based on Friday’s closing price, and with management indicating a willingness to pay the same amount out in each of the next 2 years, that means people buying Aer Lingus at these levels get nearly a 10th of their money back in a little over 2 years, while in terms of the prospects for capital appreciation, Aer Lingus exited 2011 with net cash of €317.6m, which compares to a current market cap of €521m. So for only €204m or so you get Aer Lingus’ owned aircraft, Heathrow landing slots, earnings streams etc. Sounds pretty attractive to me.

 

Speaking of Aer Lingus shares, one outfit that holds some in its funds is Matterley. I’ve met Henry and George before and I’m a fan of their value-oriented approach. I see they’re still long Aer Lingus after correctly identifying the opportunity in it when it was (and this is astonishing when you think about it) trading at a discount to its net cash. Another Irish listed stock they hold is Dragon Oil, which I traded in and out of earlier this year.

 

In terms of what to expect over the coming days, we’ve a busy week ahead in Ireland in terms of scheduled corporate newsflow. In a nutshell here are what I’m expecting / looking out for:

 

  • (Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in CRH plc) CRH trading update on Tuesday – This should be a bit of a mixed bag. Recent peer updates reveal improving trends in the United States, but patches of weakness in some of the group’s key European markets. Strong cost take-out efforts should see profitability rise compared to year-earlier levels. I will be looking for: (i) indications on how trading is going as we move into H2; and (ii) any sign of a pick-up in M&A activity.
  • United Drug results on Wednesday – Health cutbacks should presumably mean the tone of these results is reasonably subdued, but its very strong balance sheet and proven willingness to invest in expanding its international operations means that there’s an outside chance of an M&A announcement to distract from the underlying performance.
  • Glanbia trading update on Wednesday – Tough comparatives due to a blow-out 2011 will presumably mean that the headline growth rate will slow somewhat, but the underlying performance of the group should be quite resilient. Recent signs of a weakening in the dairy market won’t help, but the high-margin nutrition space is clearly going from strength to strength, as evidenced by Nestle’s recent $12bn deal for Pfizer’s infant formula business. I took profits in this name earlier in 2012, and would look to buy back in on any weakness.
  • Fyffes trading update on Thursday – I’ll be watching this one for news on (i) pricing; (ii) share buybacks (possibly); and (iii) the success the group is having with passing on high fuel costs. There may well be some read-through for Total Produce, which regular readers know is a core holding (in every sense!) in my portfolio.
  • Grafton trading update on Thursday – The main interest here will be on trading conditions in the UK and Ireland. The group has been carefully adding to its portfolio of operations through bolt-on deals in its key markets as well as in its nascent Belgian operation, so there may be an update on this also within the statement.
  • Kingspan trading update on Thursday – The group smashed expectations in its FY2011 results, so I wouldn’t be surprised to see another good update from the company this week. While its structural growth qualities are not in any doubt due to its leading position in the insulation space, any sign of an improvement in cyclical demand could be a catalyst to push these shares significantly higher.
  • (Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in PetroNeft plc) PetroNeft results on Friday – In my view, the main areas of interest in this release will be: (i) production levels, given recent disappointments on this front; and (ii) financing. What management says about these will presumably prompt a violent share price reaction – either to the upside or the downside!

Written by Philip O'Sullivan

May 6, 2012 at 4:31 pm

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