Philip O'Sullivan's Market Musings

Financial analysis from Dublin, Ireland

Market Musings 4/8/2012

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The past week has been quite hectic, with two weddings and the deadline for completing a 200 page report for the company I’m on an internship with as part of my MBA studies to safely negotiate. Hence, blogging has been a necessary casualty of my lack of free time. So, what has been happening since my last update?

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Ryanair plc) Ryanair released its Q1 results. These contained few surprises. The company is sticking to its FY net income guidance of a range of €400-440m which is reasonable in light of the early stage of its financial year. However, with the likes of Easyjet and Aer Lingus recently upping their forecasts, allied to Europe’s biggest LCC’s form for low-balling guidance (it upgraded its guidance twice in its last financial year) and healthy passenger numbers, I suspect the risks to Ryanair’s profits lie to the upside.

 

Elsewhere, as noted above Aer Lingus upgraded its FY earnings outlook in its interim results. Having previously said that 2012 profits “should match” the 2011 out-turn, it now says they will “at least match” last year’s performance. One aspect of the Aer Lingus results release that was particularly encouraging was the long haul performance – compared to the same period last year, in H1 2012 Aer Lingus’ long haul passenger numbers, load factors and yields all increased by 11.0%, 5.0% and 9.0% respectively. This is a magnificent performance given the tough economic backdrop and illustrates the success of Aer Lingus’ moves to leverage Dublin and Shannon, the only airports in Europe offering US pre-clearance, to win transatlantic customers whose journeys originated in other parts of Europe. This means that news of United Airlines terminating its Madrid-Dulles JV with Aer Lingus is not particularly concerning given that Aer Lingus clearly has sufficient demand to justify redeploying the Airbus A330 currently on the JV route to its own branded Ireland – North America routes.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in BP plc) In the energy space BP released its interim results. Market reaction was extremely downbeat, but I am (perhaps foolishly?) taking a contrarian view to this and assuming that its run of disappointments means that management will either: (i) come up with shareholder-friendly goodies (a large buyback, chunkier dividends, sensible M&A) to revitalise the share price; or (ii) come under irresistible pressure from investors to unlock the value in the firm through a break-up of the company.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Trinity Mirror plc) In the TMT segment Trinity Mirror erupted this week, with its share price gaining circa 40%, helped by strong interim results. Regular readers of this blog will know that I’ve been an uber-bull on this name for a while, based on my view that it offers a compelling mix of: (i) Very strong cashflows; (ii) Substantial tangible asset backing; (iii) Rapid deleveraging facilitating a re-rating for the equity component of the EV; and (iv) An absurdly low (and unwarranted) valuation. I’m pleased to see that my central thesis is playing out, with the first six months of 2012 bringing a £60.5m reduction in its combined net debt and pension deficit, an amount equal to 75% of what TNI’s market cap stood at on Tuesday. The catapulting of its share price since then indicates that the market may be starting to wake up to this reality. I suspect the TNI story has a lot further to run – if you annualise the H1 earnings the stock is trading on a forward PE multiple of only 2.3x!

 

In the food sector Greencore issued an upbeat trading statement which revealed healthy underlying volume growth allied to management expressing confidence that it can meet full-year earnings expectations.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in AIB plc and RBS plc) Switching to financials, I was surprised to read criticism of AIB’s announcement that it is to close a number of branches as part of its efforts to right-size its cost base. As its recent interim results showed, AIB is currently loss-making before you even take provisions into account – which is a clearly unsustainable position. Moreover, the vast majority of transactions these days are done using ATMs, cards and internet banking. Due to all of this, AIB (and indeed its domestic competitors) simply does not need as many branches as it did before.

 

Elsewhere, RBS issued an in-line set of interim results. While LIBOR, IT problems and a daft total nationalisation suggestion by elements within the British government have dominated headlines around the group, it is continuing to make impressive progress in terms of repairing its balance sheet. Investec’s Ian Gordon makes some good points around the numbers (and indeed the outlook for RBS) here. One aspect of the results that I found concerning was Ulster Bank’s impairments. RBS’ Irish unit saw impairments widen to £323m in Q2 2012 from £269m a year earlier, with mortgages to blame for this worsening trend. This has ominous read-through for the other banks operating in the Irish market.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Smurfit Kappa Group plc) In the packaging space Smurfit posted another great set of results, with Q2 EBITDA of €255m coming in right at the top of the range of analyst expectations (€236-255m). Management reaffirmed its full-year EBITDA and net debt targets, but I suspect the risk to both is to the upside given that the two largest European packaging firms, Smurfit and DS Smith, have both recently announced chunky price increases.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Abbey plc) There was more good news for my portfolio from the construction sector, with Abbey’s majority shareholder, Charles Gallagher, making an offer to buy out the minority shareholders in the company. The price being offered isn’t exactly stellar, at 0.86x trailing book value, but it’s one I’m happy to accept given that it represents a 42% return on what I paid for the shares in 2009. If only the rest of my investments worked out so well!

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Written by Philip O'Sullivan

August 4, 2012 at 8:21 am

2 Responses

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  1. […] O'Sullivan has been writing about Trinity Mirror for months, the most recent of which I've linked here. I don't have a great deal to add on either of their cases, though I suspect I am slightly less […]

  2. […] in Trinity Mirror plc) In the blogosphere Lewis has turned bullish on Trinity Mirror following last week’s strong interim results. Regular readers of this blog know I’ve been a bull on the stock for months, and it’s […]


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