Philip O'Sullivan's Market Musings

Financial analysis from Dublin, Ireland

Posts Tagged ‘Karl Whelan

Market Musings 19/9/2012

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It’s been a busy couple of days on the newsflow front, with a lot of the Irish smallcap exploration names prominent in this regard. Let’s round up on what has been happening since my last update.

 

To kick off with the energy sector, Kentz was awarded a $50m shutdown services and operations support contract by Exxon in Sakhalin, far-east Russia.

 

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in PetroNeft plc) Siberian oil producer PetroNeft released a reassuring update this morning, which revealed that output is steady at 2,000 barrels of oil per day, while early results from the Arbuzovskoye well 101, the first of ten planned new production wells on the Arbuzovskoye oil field, are encouraging. We should see a marked pick-up in newsflow from this stock over the coming months as the Arbuzovskoye campaign gathers momentum.

 

Elsewhere, Petrel Resources announced a “new start” in Iraq, with a new team in place that will “work with national and regional authorities in Iraq to identify projects in which Petrel can be involved”.

 

Providence Resources provided an update on its Rathlin Basin acreage. While this project is very much at an early stage, the company has identified a number of anomalies that it will now focus on evaluating.

 

In other resources related news, there was an interesting backward integration move by Samsung, which has invested in a gold mine in exchange for getting a cut of the output. This follows Delta Air Line’s recent purchase of an oil refinery, and may mark a shift by companies to ensure greater security of supply of key inputs and/or margin capture by buying key suppliers.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Smurfit Kappa Group plc) There was further M&A activity in the European packaging sector, with Mondi acquiring Duropack’s German and Czech operations for €125m. This is extremely welcome on two counts. Firstly, the European packaging sector has traditionally suffered from overcapacity and volatile pricing, but as I have previously noted, in recent times there has been a wave of consolidation in the industry. This should lead to more rational pricing and supply policies going forward, which will lift profitability across the sector. Secondly, from a Smurfit Kappa Group perspective, the multiples these deals are being done at highlight the value in the stock. As Davy note, using the Mondi-Duropack multiple would imply an equity value of €11.30 a share on SKG, well ahead of the €7.60 it is trading at this morning.

 

In other Smurfit Kappa news, following a recent similar move the company announced the sale of €250m worth of senior secured floating rate notes due 2020. The proceeds will be used to pre-pay term loans maturing in 2016/17 and while they will not make a significant dent in interest costs (the new notes will pay 3 month Euribor +350bps, versus the 3 month Euribor +362.5-387.5bps the term notes pay) they do push out the average maturity of the group’s debt, thus reducing the risk around the company and giving it enhanced financial flexibility.

 

In the food sector, Origin Enterprises released its full-year results this morning. These revealed a solid performance by its core agri-services business, with like-for-like operating profits up 7%. Net debt has fallen sharply to €68m compared with €92m a year earlier, which reflects the strong cash flow generation of the business (free cash flow was circa €70m, which implies a FCF yield of 12% or thereabouts). Given this, management has upped the dividend by 36%, which moves dividend cover from last year’s 4x to 3x now. Overall, these are solid results from Origin and shareholders (not least its majority owner Aryzta) will no doubt welcome the significant increase in the dividend.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Independent News & Media plc) There was some unexpected fall-out from the Irish Daily Star’s (appalling) decision to publish pictures of the Duchess of Cambridge, with 50% owner Richard Desmond saying that he would take “immediate steps to close down the joint venture“. This is easier said than done, given the troubles this would involve with redundancies, property leases, a loss of profits and printing contracts. While there has been speculation that this could be a stroke by Desmond to replace a 50% owned JV with his 100% owned UK Daily Star in the Irish market, I can’t see INM abandoning its sole presence in the national daily tabloid space. So, either this dispute is settled amicably (perhaps with INM agreeing a call option to buy out Desmond?) or not, in which case INM will likely launch a new tabloid (using a different title, as Desmond owns the rights to the Daily Star name) which should be able to more than hold its own against any imported competitor whose relevance to the Irish market could well prove to be uncertain.

 

In the blogosphere, Lewis looked at Wincanton, with his blog providing enough to persuade me that I don’t need to look at it in more detail!

 

And finally, if you’ve ever wanted to learn more about money and banking, UCD’s top-rated Professor Karl Whelan has very kindly put up his lecture slides from a course on this very topic.

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Market Musings 29/6/2012

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It’s been an incredibly busy 48 hours since my last update. Let’s run through what’s been happening on a sector-by-sector basis.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Allied Irish Banks plc and Bank of Ireland plc) We saw a lot of news out of the Irish financials. Bank of Ireland issued a couple of updates. The first related to the Irish mortgage market, where the group revealed that its share of new lending has increased to 40%, while it did not indicate (emphasis) any change in the pace of arrears relative to its previously stated expectations. Its second update, released yesterday, brought confirmation that Bank of Ireland has completed its €10bn divestment programme within PCAR base case assumptions. This comes as no surprise (the group had previously disclosed that it was 97% of the way through this) but it is an incremental positive and reaffirms my previously expressed view that Bank of Ireland is doing an excellent job at managing the factors it has control over. Bank of Ireland’s main domestic competitor, AIB, released an AGM statement yesterday, the key points of which are: (i) Its non-core business is performing better than expected; (ii) The integration of EBS is going well; and (iii) AIB’s share of the mortgage market is now 35%. On the last point, adding in Bank of Ireland’s share noted above means that 75% of  Irish new mortgages are being issued by AIB and Bank of Ireland – so, essentially a duopoly market. Smallcap IFG’s AGM statement revealed a good start to the year for its core UK and Irish operations, while management said it is going to review its options post the sale of its international unit. Elsewhere, NAMA repaid another €2bn of bonds,  taking its total debt paydown in the past 2 years to circa €3.5bn. At the end of 2011 NAMA had €29.1bn of debt securities in issue, along with another €1.6bn of a subordinated equity instrument. Overnight we heard news of a ‘breakthrough‘ agreement on Ireland’s debt burden which may have significant effects on the banks here. However, I would echo the caution expressed by Constantin Gurdgiev here, namely “we cannot tell how positive it is yet”.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in RBS plc) Switching to financials in other jurisdictions, the LIBOR investigation has had a significant impact on sector valuations in the UK. Also, the “Dude. I owe you big time! Come over one day after work and I’m opening a bottle of Bollinger” quote on page 19 of the FSA’s report should have a significant impact on what people put in work emails in future! From my perspective, my UK bank sector exposure is limited to a small position in RBS, which had already become smaller on the back of its IT problems. Yesterday’s 11.5% slump threatens to push the share price below £2 for the first time since the 1-for-10 reverse share consolidation. I’m still positive on the stock on a longer-term perspective, and am monitoring its current difficulties closely with a view to gauging if the risk/reward justifies topping up my position – although clearly this is not something I envisage happening in the immediate future.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in PetroNeft plc) This morning’s 2011 results from PetroNeft give me few grounds for optimism. While management say that “production levels have been stabilised”, at 2,200bopd presently output is still below the 2,300bopd reported in early April and the 3,000bopd achieved at the end of 2011. I also note management’s comments that: “we have initiated discussions with a range of strategic investors about possible farm-outs, long term off-take agreements and potential equity or asset investments which in the long term would strengthen the Group’s financial position”. This ties in with the revelation that Macquarie wishes to reduce its $30m available loan facility to PetroNeft by $7.5m, “however they are giving the Group time to work this out “. Overall my sense is that a solution to the challenges PTR faces will likely prove to be unfriendly to existing shareholders, but assuming I’m right perhaps this is already reflected in the price as I note that the shares have opened higher this morning.

 

In the food sector, Greencore made what it described as a ‘platform acquisition’ in the US, buying Schau for £11m, or around 0.5x annual revenues. It also revealed a new $50m contract, which assuming a 6% margin should lead to around $3m in extra operating profits on a full-year basis. Overall, Greencore’s US business continues to make progress, but it is still a marginal player in a huge market – I wonder would the capital the group has tied up here be better deployed in strengthening its strong position in the UK instead of trying to build a sizeable operation in the States. In other Irish food company news, Origin Enterprises released a fascinating presentation about its agronomy operations. I’m very bullish on the long-term outlook for this business, which is underpinned by rising food consumption across the world, the lifting of EU quotas and food security issues.

 

In the support services sector, CPL Resources released an upbeat trading statement, featuring the word “strong” no less than three times, which bodes well for Ireland Inc.

 

(Disclaimer: I am a shareholder in Trinity Mirror plc) In the media sector,  News International raised the cover price of The Sun newspaper, which could (emphasis) pave the way for Trinity Mirror to follow suit with its Daily Mirror title.

 

In the blogosphere Lewis took a look at Plastics Capital, which is not a name I’m too familiar with and based on his blog not one I wish to become more acquainted with anytime soon! Speaking of blogs, FT Alphaville posted up UCD Professor Karl Whelan’s Target2 presentation. I was particularly struck by slide 20 – Eurozone countries’ net balances with the Eurosystem.

 

Finally, John Kingham looks at how his top tips for 2012 have performed in the year to date – I will outline how mine have done over the weekend.

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